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Team of the WWC Group Stage

17 July 2017 National Sport


Last Updated: 16/07/17 7:16pm

Tammy Beaumont has scored 372 runs so far, with a best of 148

Tammy Beaumont has scored 372 runs so far, with a best of 148

After 28 enthralling matches, the line-up for the semi-finals of the ICC Women’s World Cup is decided.

As England prepare to take on South Africa, live on Sky Sports Cricket on Tuesday, and Australia get ready to face India – a match you can watch live on the same channel on Thursday – has picked his Team of the Group Stage.

Check out his XI below, then join us for what promises to be a mouth-watering climax to the tournament…

1 – Tammy Beaumont (England)

Although not at her fluid best so far this tournament, the England opener gritted it out through the tough times and cashed in whenever possible to end with 372 runs. That left her top of the run-scorer’s table, demonstrating her adaptability and determination, as well showing the potential for huge returns in the knockout stages if she hits peak form. Also capable of taking the gloves.

Watch Tammy Beaumont and Sarah Taylor make a record second wicket stand of 275 as England beat South Africa by 68 runs

2 – Nicole Bolton (Australia)

With new glasses came greater consistency for Australian opener Bolton. An already dependable performer, she was advised to wear specialised spectacles for the tournament after health checks showed her sight was worsening. The move proved profitable, resulting in 337 runs, including one century and two fifties.

3 – Mithali Raj (India)

A record-breaking tournament for Raj, India’s greatest batter became the leading run-scorer in women’s ODI history. A calming presence in an otherwise stormy batting line-up, Raj hit a century in the crunch match against New Zealand to ensure her team progressed to the semi-finals, as she finished the group stage with 356 runs.

India's Mithali Raj surpassed Charlotte Edwards at the top of the run-scoring charts

India's Mithali Raj surpassed Charlotte Edwards at the top of the run-scoring charts

India’s Mithali Raj surpassed Charlotte Edwards at the top of the run-scoring charts

4 – Meg Lanning (Australia)

Despite suffering from a reoccurring injury to her right shoulder and being rested for two matches, the Australian captain still managed to score 328 runs. That left her sixth highest in the run-scoring ranks, as she twice marshalled her team to victory.

5 – Ellyse Perry (Australia)

Ellyse Perry drives during Australia's victory over Pakistan

Ellyse Perry drives during Australia's victory over Pakistan

Ellyse Perry drives during Australia’s victory over Pakistan

A delight to watch with the bat, the all-rounder surpassed 60 runs in all but two of her matches, averaging 91.50 during the group stage. Able to both bat aggressively and hold together an Australian middle-order that has appeared shaky at time this tournament, Perry ended up second in the run-scorers chart. While she’s struggled with her bowling in recent months, it remains a useful weapon.

6 – Nat Sciver (England)

No player has made such an impact on this tournament as England’s Nat Sciver. While her unorthodox ‘Nat-meg’ shot got the most attention, the two centuries she scored, having never reached triple figures before, were more notable. A powerful batter, Sciver displayed her growing maturity with the bat to ensure England set large totals when coming to the crease at perilous positions.

Check out this inventive shot from England Women’s Nat Sciver – the Nat-meg!

7 – Dane van Niekerk (South Africa)

The South African skipper made history when she became the first player to take four wickets without conceding a run as the West Indies were bowled out for 48. She ended up as the group stage leading wicket-taker as her flighted spin, often going above the eyeline, accounted for 15 players.

8 – Marizanne Kapp (South Africa)

One part of what South Africa captain Van Niekerk describes as the “best opening pair in the world”, Kapp, the No 1 ranked ODI bowler, completed the group stage as the leading fast bowling wicket-taker. While she did endure a difficult time against England, where her usual menacing line and length wavered, Kapp still took three wickets.

Marizanne Kapp celebrates taking the wicket of Pakistan's Ayesha Zafar

Marizanne Kapp celebrates taking the wicket of Pakistan's Ayesha Zafar

Marizanne Kapp celebrates taking the wicket of Pakistan’s Ayesha Zafar

9 – Amelia Kerr (New Zealand)

What were you doing at 16-years-old? For New Zealand youngster Kerr it’s taking 10 wickets in your debut international tournament. As comfortable competing in the World Cup as anyone her senior, the confident leg-spinner already possesses a wrong’un, and has removed the likes of Lanning, Beaumont and Sciver.

10 – Alex Hartley (England)

While Hartley has not got as many wickets as other candidates vying for a bowling place, she has displayed her aptitude to step up in big game moments and decide matches. It was her spell against Australia that halted their chase and swung the match in England’s favour.

Alex Hartley took 2-31 in the dramatic victory over Australia

Alex Hartley took 2-31 in the dramatic victory over Australia

Alex Hartley took 2-31 in the dramatic victory over Australia

11 – Kristen Beams (Australia)

Beams didn’t play international cricket until she was 29, but three years on she has made quick work of impressing her first World Cup outing, and what could be her last. A vital part of the Australian trio of spinners, Beams offers controlled, if unassuming, leg spin. Yet that wicket-to-wicket reliability saw her take dismiss 11 players, the most by an Australian.

Watch England Women take on South Africa Women in the first ICC Women’s World Cup final, live on Sky Sports Cricket from 10am. The winner will take on the victor of Thursday’s clash between Australia Women and India Women – live on Sky Sports Cricket from 10am on Thursday.


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